new-aesthetic
new-aesthetic:

Placemeter | Making your city better

Imagine never having to guess how busy your favorite restaurant is or waiting in line at the grocery store. Placemeter is making it possible, one sensor at a time. Be smarter about your time—and help your neighbors do the same—by becoming a Meter.

Startup wants to use your old phone taped to your window to track how busy locations are.
Previously posted, without knowing the source of the imagery: video of Placemeter’s algorithmic output.
Video of Placemeter’s pitch at Websummit: “Many of you look at this video and see Times Square. But I have 20 years of computer vision experience, and I see a data mine here.”

new-aesthetic:

Placemeter | Making your city better

Imagine never having to guess how busy your favorite restaurant is or waiting in line at the grocery store. Placemeter is making it possible, one sensor at a time. Be smarter about your time—and help your neighbors do the same—by becoming a Meter.

Startup wants to use your old phone taped to your window to track how busy locations are.

Previously posted, without knowing the source of the imagery: video of Placemeter’s algorithmic output.

Video of Placemeter’s pitch at Websummit: “Many of you look at this video and see Times Square. But I have 20 years of computer vision experience, and I see a data mine here.”

tinycartridge

tinycartridge:

The Animal Crossing: New Leaf birthday party ⊟

Look at the birthday party My Paper Crane’s Heidi Kenney threw for her 11-year-old. The Tom Nook pinata. The bell-bag invites. The villager cookies, made from 3D-printed cookie cutters.

The presents on balloons at the table (with a Spoonflower-printed Animal Crossing tablecloth).

Every detail of this is perfect, except for the part where I’m not the birthday boy. Do you think Animal Crossing will still be in style in 10 years, when it’s time for my girls’ 11th?

BUY Animal Crossing: New Leaf ($29.84 right now!), upcoming games

So I’m walking home, a little drunk, thinking of exes and assholes and generally in a bad mood. As I’m crossing a street, a car starts honking. I run to the side and the kid driving goes “Hey! You tutored me!” And I said hey, waved back, kept walking. He turns, pulls over next to me and excitedly yells “I got into college! Haverford!” And it made my night a little less awful.

algopop
algopop:

“As algorithmic systems become more prevalent, I’ve begun to notice of a variety of emergent behaviors evolving to work around these constraints, to deal with the insufficiency of these black box systems…The first behavior is adaptation. These are situations where I bend to the system’s will. For example, adaptations to the shortcomings of voice UI systems — mispronouncing a friend’s name to get my phone to call them; overenunciating; or speaking in a different accent because of the cultural assumptions built into voice recognition. We see people contort their behavior to perform for the system so that it responds optimally.”
Alexis Lloyd (NYTimes R&D) shares some interesting views under the title In the Loop: Designing Conversations with Algorithms.

algopop:

As algorithmic systems become more prevalent, I’ve begun to notice of a variety of emergent behaviors evolving to work around these constraints, to deal with the insufficiency of these black box systems…The first behavior is adaptation. These are situations where I bend to the system’s will. For example, adaptations to the shortcomings of voice UI systems — mispronouncing a friend’s name to get my phone to call them; overenunciating; or speaking in a different accent because of the cultural assumptions built into voice recognition. We see people contort their behavior to perform for the system so that it responds optimally.”

Alexis Lloyd (NYTimes R&D) shares some interesting views under the title In the Loop: Designing Conversations with Algorithms.

The series finale revealed that to the degree this is what the show seemed to be saying, the joke was on you. It was a nine-year long con (as James Poniewozik put it) that fooled you into thinking it wasn’t running on an engine of total cliché when – psych! – it totally was. Because it turned out that of course Ted wasn’t really saying everything matters, that your whole life is important, that you can still love people even if you don’t end up with them, that the good pieces and the bad pieces and the ups and the downs were all part of the story of how you wound up in the right place.

Oh, ‘Mother’: An Awful End To A Long Love Story : Monkey See : NPR

Posting mostly because I love Linda Holmes for suggesting that more pop culture should remind you that everything matters, your whole life is important, you can still love people even if you don’t end up with them, and the good pieces and the bad pieces and the ups and the downs are all part of the story of how you wind up in the right place.